Poetry in Motion: Vintage Speed

A poetry and racing project by Connie Ann Kirk. Please Note: "This project is made possible, in part, with public funds from the New York State Foundation of the Arts' Decentralization Program, administered locally by The ARTS Council of the Southern Finger Lakes."

Above

ABOVE: Racer John Monson, M.D. competes in his formerly owned 1970 Crossle 19F Formula 2 / Formula Atlantic, a rare Irish race car driven professionally in period by Ken Fildes. (Photo: Courtesy EcurieScalpel.com). Connie Ann Kirk, Ph.D. is writing a book about racers and racing.

Monday, July 15, 2013

Update: Best of Luck to John Monson's / Ken Fildes's Crossle 19F


[Photo:  John Monson races his formerly owned, rare 1970 Irish race car, the Crossle 19F Formula 2 / Formula Atlantic, with wings, campaigned in period by Ken Fildes.  Photo courtesy: John Monson].

This car recently left the shores of the U.S. to return to Europe. 

It was the first race car that I became "attached" to, so I'm more than sad to see it go.  I watched the car be maintained in the paddock at Watkins Glen, watched it race there, wrote poems about it, and wrote about the car and took pictures of it for my first magazine article about motor sports.  Of course, the pretty little Irish car was also used here as the masthead for the Poetry in Motion: Vintage Speed historic motor racing and poetry project blog.  In short, I "bonded" with the car!

I wish the car a "long and healthy life," many more quick laps, and new adventures in the future. 

Maybe I'll see the Crossle 19F up close again one day. 

I hope so. 

[Note:  To follow any of my new blog posts about racing, poetry and other subjects, please visit the blog that evolved out of this one called "Motor Sport Muse."  Thank you for your interest!].

NEW!  An update of links showing images of the CrosslĂ© 19F, with Brian Cullen driving, is now on the Motor Sport Muse blog, HERE.

Thursday, May 9, 2013

Crossing the Finish Line!


It has now been about 8 months since I read my poetry for the Poetry in Motion: Vintage Speed project sponsored by the New York State Council on the Arts.  The bumper sticker magnets are out, and the project has been long since completed.

At this time, I think it is best to close this blog and start another, more general motor sports blog that will not be focused on this project primarily, as this one was.  Many of the kinds of posts you've come to expect to see here, however -- links to my Rochester Motor Sports articles, videos, musings about speed and racers, etc. -- will continue at the new blog.  This one will remain online, since the bumper sticker magnets have this address on them, and readers may want to explore the ins and outs of the project as it was in progress throughout 2012, along with the tidbits, videos, etc. that I shared along the way.

Some day, I do hope to publish the 14 poems that were written for Poetry in Motion: Vintage Speed.  I am currently adding poems to those so that I may have a book-length project to prepare for publication.  Watch out at the book vendors you see at historic motor racing events -- you just might see a little book of poetry by me on one of their tables one day!

Thank you to my readers!  Please accept my invitation to join me at the new motor sports blog -- Motor Sport Muse.  Yes; I do get kind of hung-up on the idea of musing, don't I?  Ha.  My more general writer's blog has a similar title, The Not-So-Daily Muse.  My website is located at ConnieAnnKirk.com and has links to all my current projects as well.

I wish you all good days and nights, and thank you all once again for your support of this project.

Godspeed!

~Connie Ann Kirk, Ph.D.



Wednesday, February 27, 2013

Sir Stirling Moss: Charm Included

Chris Huhne finds a champion in Stirling Moss

Here's a story Sir Stirling Moss told recently about how he would avoid getting a speeding ticket!

Charm's a'flowing, as usual!

If you ever get a chance to hear this man tell his stories -- go!

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/newstopics/mandrake/9895210/Chris-Huhne-finds-a-champion-in-Stirling-Moss.html

Tuesday, February 26, 2013

Car Songs: "Crashed," Daughtry


Followers of the blog will know that I've been collecting car songs.  Here is another, at least it is to my mind, and ear.

We're not sure what does the crashing of one person into another in this song, "Crashed" performed by Chris Daughtry.  It could be the "runaway train," but I like to think of it as a car and the "runaway train" as the trip the two go on in the uncertain journey of their relationship.  Well.  The lyrics resonate with me, anyway -- how about you?  (Enjoyed best at high volume!  Ha!).

Lyrics:

Well I was moving at the speed of sound.
Head-spinning, couldn't find my way around, and
Didn't know that I was going down.
Yeah, yeah.
Where I've been, well it's all a blur.
What I was looking for, I'm not sure.
Too late and didn't see it coming.
Yeah, yeah.

And then I crashed into you,
And I went up in flames.
Could've been the death of me,
But then you breathed your breath in me.
And I crashed into you,
Like a runaway train.
You will consume me,
But I can't walk away.

Somehow, I couldn't stop myself.
I just wanted to know how it felt.
Too strong, I couldn't hold on.
Yeah, yeah.
Now I'm just tryin' to make some sense
Out of how and why this happened.
Where we're heading, there's just no knowing.
Yeah, yeah.

And then I crashed into you,
And I went up in flames.
Could've been the death of me,
But then you breathed your breath in me.
And I crashed into you,
Like a runaway train.
You will consume me,
But I can't walk away.

From your face, your eyes
Are burning to me.
You saved me, you gave me
Just what I need.
Oh, just what I need.

And then I crashed into you,
And I went up in flames.
Could've been the death of me,
But then you breathed your breath in me.
And I crashed into you,
Like a runaway train.
You will consume me,
But I can't walk away.

And then I crashed into you,
And then I crashed into you,
And then I crashed into you,
And then I crashed into you,
And I crashed into you,
Like a runaway train.
You will consume me,
But I can't walk away

Thursday, February 7, 2013

Historic Racers at Watkins Glen in LIFE IN THE FINGER LAKES Magazine


Nice to see my article in the Fall, 2012 issue of Life in the Finger Lakes Magazine has now been digitally archived online at their site.  The article goes from p. 46-51 (you can zoom in on the pages at the magazine's site to make them bigger to read).

It was so much fun talking with these guys and watching them race!  Thanks again, Marc & John!




  

Wednesday, January 30, 2013

Sirs Stirling Moss and Patrick Stewart -- the BBC Doc.


Sirs Stirling Moss and Patrick Stewart -- the BBC Doc.

He's beloved in Britain and indeed around the world, not only by those who appreciate motor racing but also by those who value athletes from a former time who did not take the spectators of their sport for granted.  In December, 2012, the BBC broadcast a documentary called Racing Legends:  Stirling Moss.  It is part of a new BBC series about legends of motor sports, and it is terrific. 

I highly recommend this documentary, actually not only for fans of Sir Stirling but really for anyone.  It is well done and especially showcases with joy and humor, poignancy and grace, how one man, also in his senior years (Sir Patrick is in his 70s; Sir Stirling about 10 years older), can still have feelings for a hero of his youth so many years later.  What does it mean to Stewart to meet his hero from the world of racing, and what does it mean to him to actually drive some of the same cars driven by the Stirling Moss he watched race?

The BBC was given access not only to the Moss home in London but also to rides along with him and Stewart in cars he helped make famous.  Stewart is given the opportunity to drive at least one of these legendary race cars himself.

I can't imagine how strange, or even humbling, it must be for Sir Stirling to see a fellow knight, OBE, reacting in the way Stewart does with him and the cars he drove "at work."  Racers tend to be a practical sort, rather than necessarily romantic or nostalgic, I've found.  Was Sir Stirling perhaps bemused at all of this reverence, fuss, and attention from this actor of both stage and screen? 

I certainly did not expect to laugh and cry watching this video, but I actually did both!  Stewart, as an award-winning actor, is capable of conveying his emotions as he experiences this life-long dream.  At one point, whether planned or spontaneous, he remarks while sliding into a race car, "This beats the Enterprise any day," reminding the viewer that this is not someone who hasn't experienced much in life but is in fact someone accomplished in his own right who did not let holding onto a dream prevent him from attempting and conquering other feats in life in other directions.

It is fun to watch a young person, or even a middle-ager, experience a dream come true -- it's quite another to watch an accomplished man in his senior years be able to do the same thing.  The right significance and level of appreciation is there, heartfelt and full.  The advanced years of both men only make watching them in action together all the more joyous and poignant.

The documentary struck me as encapsulating what much of historic racing is about for so many of its participants -- a chance to live the dream before the night, alas, is over.

On December 26, Sir Patrick Stewart posted to his Twitter account:  "So proud to have helped make this documentary and hardly able to believe what cars I drove."

The documentary is a tribute to a gentleman I've written about before.  It's also, though, a tribute to the dream in all of us, showing us how ageless dreams are, and how, even as we age into our senior golden years, the days of wisdom, we stay alive as long as our dreams burn brightly within us.

Tuesday, December 4, 2012

The 'Boss' finally finds a home -- 2013 Ford Mustang Boss 302

[Photo:  Connie Ann Kirk].

The International Motor Racing Research Center finally gave away the 'Boss'!  See who won by clicking on this link which will take you to my Examiner article on the subject.